Instagram Ruffles Feathers With New SnapchatLike App Bolt

first_img Register Now » 2 min read This week, Instagram rolled out Bolt, a new app that lets users record and send quick, unedited photo or video messages by tapping on a friend’s photo. The message then disappears when you swipe your screen. The app is currently only available to users in New Zealand, Singapore and South Africa. Instagram told The Verge that since 65 percent of Instagram users are based internationally, “we are starting with a handful of countries to make sure we can scale the experience.”Bolt is only the most recent offering of Snapchat-esque apps, a crowded slate that includes Wickr, a “top-secret messenger” that recently raised $30 million; Slingshot, an app created by Facebook that has a unique “I-send-you-send” stipulation; and the Berlin-based one-click messaging app TapTalk. Related: Want Your Brand Associated With Positivity? Snap a Pic, Ditch the Tweet.TapTalk in particular seems to be a model that Bolt is aping, and in an interview with TechCrunch published yesterday, TapTalk CEO Onno Faber said “we know we have a great product, so clones don’t come as a surprise.”Also not particularly thrilled about Instagram’s entry into the market is a free phone-calling app called Bolt. On Monday, Bolt CEO Andrew Benton posted an open letter urging Instagram to reconsider using the name Bolt, saying it’s already causing confusion for their customers.”It wasn’t too long ago that you were the little guy,” Benton wrote. “I know you haven’t forgotten how hard it is to build something from nothing. And not just technology, but a brand and distinct identity for yourself. Imagine how it would have felt if Google or Apple or Facebook had launched a photo-sharing app called Instagram in 2011.”Related: This Bar Wants You to Apply for a Job Via Snapchat Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. July 30, 2014last_img read more

Rep Crawford introduces Medal of Honor Day resolution

first_img15Mar Rep. Crawford introduces Medal of Honor Day resolution State Rep. Kathy Crawford today introduced House Resolution 279 observing March 15, 2018 as Medal of Honor Day in Michigan.Medal of Honor Day commemorates the highest military decoration awarded by the President of the United States to members of the armed forces who have distinguished themselves through acts of valor.Rep. Crawford was honored to recognize Lt. Col. Charles Kettles on the House floor. Lt. Kettles is Michigan’s most recent Medal of Honor recipient, renowned for his brave and selfless acts during his service in the Vietnam War.“Today is a very special day. It is imperative that we continue to honor the brave men and women who have selflessly served our country,” Rep. Crawford said. “I’m honored to welcome Lt. Col. Charles Kettles to thank him and recognize his outstanding service.”House Resolution 279 passed the Michigan House of Representatives unanimously. Categories: Crawford Newslast_img read more

Drilling Intersects 102 Meters of 197 gpt Gold at

first_imgDrilling Intersects 102 Meters of 1.97 gpt Gold at Columbus Gold’s Paul Isnard Gold Project; Drilling Confirms Depth Extension of Gold MineralizationColumbus Gold Corporation (CGT: TSX-V) (“Columbus Gold”) is pleased to announce results of the initial five (5) core drill holes at its Paul Isnard gold project in French Guiana. The holes confirm depth extension of gold mineralization below shallow holes drilled on the 43-101 compliant 1.9 million ounce Montagne d’Or inferred gold deposit at Paul Isnard in the 1990’s and support the current program of resource expansion through offsetting open-ended gold mineralization indicated by the earlier holes.Robert Giustra, CEO of Columbus Gold, commented: “These drill results validate Columbus Gold’s approach to adding ounces with a lower-risk drilling program designed to infill and to extend the mineralized zones to 200 m vertical depth from surface; a depth amenable to open pit mining.”  Fourteen (14) holes have been completed (assays pending) by Columbus Gold in the current program and drilling is progressing at the rate of about 3,000 meters per month with one drill-rig on a 24 hour basis. Columbus Gold plans to accelerate the current program by engaging a second drill-rig as soon as one can be obtained. Please visit our website for more information about the project. It was more than obvious [at least to me] that a heavy hand showed up in these markets at, or just before, the London p.m. gold fixGold didn’t do a lot on Tuesday, either.  The rally that developed in early Far East trading, ran into a seller just before 11:00 a.m. Hong Kong time…which was the same thing that happened during the Monday trading session.From there, the gold price didn’t do much until the 8:20 a.m. Eastern Comex open.  At that point the dollar index cratered…and gold took off…running into a not-for-profit seller at the London p.m. gold fix which came shortly after 10:00 a.m. in New York.  The high tick at the ‘fix’ was $1,739.10 spot.Despite the fact that the dollar continued to decline, the gold price continued to get sold down until around lunch time on the East coast…and from there traded sideways into the 5:15 p.m. electronic close.Gold finished the Tuesday session at $1,732.50 spot…up only $7.70 on the day.  Net volume was the same as Monday’s…115,000 contracts.It was basically the same story in silver as well, except for the fact that the rally at the Comex open was so strong, that a not-for-profit seller had to enter the market around 9:35 a.m. Eastern, or silver would have been materially higher [and well above $34 spot] by the London gold fix, which occurred thirty minutes later.  The high tick of the day at that point was $33.95 spot.And, like gold, despite the fact that the dollar index was declining steadily, silver continued to get sold off to its New York low…$33.30 spot…which came about 3:20 p.m. in electronic trading.  The price recovered a hair into the close.Silver finished the day at $33.48 spot…up a meager 14 cents from Monday.  Volume, 38,000 contracts, was down quite a bit from Monday’s 48,500 contracts…but still very high.Without doubt, both gold and silver would have finished materially higher if a willing seller hadn’t show up at, or just before, the London p.m. gold fix in both metals…and it was precisely the same story in platinum and palladium as well.The dollar index opened around the 80.40 mark on Monday evening…and chopped around that point until about 3:20 p.m. Hong Kong time, or about forty minutes before the 8:30 a.m. BST London open.  During the next hour, the index dropped a bit over 20 basis points…and then more or less traded sideways until 8:30 a.m. in New York.  Then the index headed south with a vengeance…and by 11:30 a.m. Eastern, the dollar index had shed another 40 odd basis points to its low of the day, which was around 79.82…and then recovered a handful of basis points going into the close.  The dollar closed down 50 points on the day at 79.89.If you check all four precious metal charts from yesterday, you’ll note that all had a very positive reactions to the pre-London open dollar index decline.  And that state of affairs continued in New York when the index did another face plant starting around 8:30 a.m. Eastern.  All the precious metals took off to the upside…and all ran into the same not-for-profit seller at the London p.m. gold fix…except for silver.As I said further up, its rally was so strong, it had to be dealt with early, or it would have blasted through the $34 spot price like a hot knife through soft butter…and that was obviously not going to be allowed…just like it wasn’t allowed in early morning trading in Hong Kong on Monday.  Check the silver chart above for the details.From the London p.m. gold fix, until the dollar index nadir at 11:30 a.m. Eastern, the dollar index and the precious metals prices all declined together.  That’s just too cute for words.There are no market anymore…only interventions.Although the gold price hit its zenith shortly after 10:00 a.m. Eastern time, the shares powered a bit higher, hitting their high of the day around 11:30 a.m. Eastern…which was the dollar index low.  After that they went into decline but, like Monday, finished just off their lows…and the HUI closed up 0.55%.  Excuse me for thinking out loud at this point, but the saw-tooth pattern to this chart tells me that someone with a fairly large position appeared to be selling into this rally.The silver stocks finished mixed…and Nick Laird’s Silver Sentiment Index closed up 0.67%.(Click on image to enlarge)The CME’s Daily Delivery Report was rather interesting.  There was no delivery activity in gold, but there were 270 silver contracts posted for delivery within the Comex-approved warehouse system on Thursday.  The only short/issuer was Jefferies…and the biggest long/stopper was, once again, JPMorgan…with 202 contracts in its in-house [proprietary] trading account…and 23 for their client accounts.  The Issuers and Stoppers Report is worth a quick look…and the link is here.There were no reported changes in either GLD or SLV yesterday.Nick Laird advised me that Sprott added another 40,535 troy ounces of gold to their Physical Gold Trust on Monday.  That should just about cover the entire amount received in their follow-on offering…but I expect there’s a bit more when the underwriters exercise their ‘Greenshoe Option’.Over at the U.S Mint, they reported selling another 50,000 silver eagles…and I do hope that you’re getting your share, dear reader.The action at the Comex-approved depositories on Monday is hardly worth mentioning, as only a few thousand ounces of silver were received…and shipped out.I don’t have very many stories today…and that suits me just fine.  I hope you have the time to skim them all.Despite the positive closes in all four precious metals, it was more than obvious [at least to me] that a heavy hand showed up in these markets at, or just before, the London p.m. gold fix at 3:00 p.m. BST…10:00 a.m. in New York.  With the dollar index in free-fall, the precious metals were not allowed to do what they wanted to do…and that is close the day materially higher than they did on Monday.You’re perfectly entitled to your own opinion on this, but that’s the way it appeared to me…and if you have some other explanation for yesterday’s 180 degree move in the precious metals while the dollar index was falling out of bed, I’d love to hear it.Yesterday, at the 1:30 p.m. Eastern time Comex close, was the cut-off for this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report…and as I’ve been stating all along, it will not make for happy reading…especially with the huge volumes [and price increases] we’ve seen in both gold and silver since last Tuesday’s cut-off on September 4th.  JPMorgan et al are still acting as short sellers of last resort and preventing the precious metal prices from blowing sky high.  I’ll be curious to know how much larger JPMorgan’s short position in silver has become since last Friday’s report.  Ted Butler says it’s north of 27% of the entire Comex futures market in silver on a net basis.  Will it break 30% on Friday?I’m still of the opinion that we’ve seen a short-term top, but would love to be proven wrong.  A quick engineered sell-off by “da boyz” to relieve the current overbought condition wouldn’t bother me in the slightest…and would be a buying opportunity that I would take full advantage of.  Of course if/when the sell-off does come, it will allow these short sellers of last resort to harvest all the new long positions that have been placed and ring cash register one more time.In Far East trading on their Wednesday, both gold and silver prices chopped slowly higher.  For a change, volumes in both metals are significantly lower than they were on either Monday or Tuesday, so I wouldn’t read a whole heck of a lot into the price action.  The dollar index is down about 11 basis points as London opens for trading at 8:00 a.m. local time…3:00 a.m. Eastern.London trading opened quietly, but that all changed around 9:15 a.m. BST, when gold and silver blasted higher in seconds, not minutes.  Gold was up fifteen bucks…and silver shot through $34 spot at warp speed.  The reaction from JPMorgan et al was instantaneous.  Gold volume jumped from 13,000 contracts to 34,000 contracts in a heart beat…and silver’s volume went from around 4,800 contracts to 9,500 contracts in the same period of time…seconds.  Then, after that assault, it appears that another rally is underway…and silver is now back at $34.00 spot once again…and gold is struggling higher.  No ‘for profit’ seller ever sells into a rally like that…EVER!!!  This is in-your-face price management by the bullion banks…and the farthest thing from a free market that one can imagine.  It was obvious that ‘da boyz’ were lying in wait for this event.Here’s what Kitco’s silver chart looked like at 5:14 a.m. Eastern time…I would guess that this price action was centered around the announcement from the German court…and we’ll probably find out more as the day goes along.Before I sign off today, most of you may already have heard that we have a new writer at Casey Research…and his name is Dennis Miller.  He’s been a regular reader of my column for many years…and now, like me, he’s working for Doug.  Dennis is retired…and has been working tirelessly to rebuild his nest egg since the crash of 2008, when his CDs were recalled and it was cut by 50%.  He’s documented his journey in his book Retirement Reboot…and he thinks highly enough of what I’ve had to say over the years, to mention my name in a couple of places in it.  The book is priced at a pittance…a mere $9.95…and you can find all about it here.  It costs nothing to check it out.It could be an interesting day during Comex trading in New York today.See you tomorrow. 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Indian sacred texts and the logic of computer ethics

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Project website: mimamsa.logic.at/ideas.html Classical logic deals with statements which are either true or false, and it provides rules we can use to combine true statements, creating new statements which are also true. This is how mathematics works: if we start out with something true and follow a certain set of rules, the end result will still be true. But this kind of logic is not useful if we want to deal with ethics. “When we are dealing with prohibitions and obligations, we are not interested in what is true or false, but in what we should or should not do,” says Ciabattoni. “Therefore, a completely different kind of logic is required, called deontic logic. Just like classical logic, it can be expressed as mathematical formulae which allow us to unequivocally prove whether or not a certain line of reasoning is correct.”There have been attempts to create such a “deontic logic,” but so far the success has been limited. “We are confident that working with the Vedas and the school of Mīmāṃsā will greatly help us to understand how deontic logic can work,” says Ciabattoni. “These ancient Sanskrit texts provide us with many arguments, carefully analysed for centuries, on which we can test our mathematical formulae.”The Ethics of Self-Driving CarsSuch a deontic logic could be used to teach ethics to computers. A machine could be given a certain set of obligations and prohibitions, and following certain rules it could then determine automatically, whether or not a certain kind of behaviour is acceptable or not. “Consider a self-driving car during a traffic accident,” says Agata Ciabattoni. “Let’s assume that a crash is inevitable, and somebody will definitely get hurt – but the car has to decide whom to harm and whom to spare.” A general rule such as “do not harm anybody” will not help in this case. Much like in the ancient Vedas, certain rules have to be combined to arrive at the logical solution. And perhaps such machine decisions will even be more ethical and beneficial to us humans as a human decision would be. The Indian sacred texts of the Vedas have been studied for millennia. But now, for the first time in history, computer scientists in Vienna analyse them by applying the methods of mathematical logic. This gives Sanskritists new insights and can even settle philosophical disputes which are more than one or two thousand years old. On the other hand, it helps computer scientists to develop reasoning tools to deal with deontic concepts (such as prohibitions and obligations). Such tools are enormously important if we want to implement ethics in artificial intelligence – for instance if a self-driving car has to make ethical decisions in case of an accident. Credit: Vienna University of Technology Explore further Provided by Vienna University of Technology Applying the Laws of Logic to Ancient Texts”The Vedas are a large body of ancient Sanskrit texts, some of which contain very clear moral statements – such as ‘one should not harm any living being'”, says Agata Ciabattoni from the Institute of Logic and Computation at TU Wien. She is leading the research project, in close collaboration with Elisa Freschi, Sanskritist from the Austrian Academy of Science. There is a philosophical school originated in ancient India in the last centuries BCE, called Mīmāṃsā, which uses a rigorous approach to analyse the obligations and prohibitions mentioned in the Vedas. For many centuries, Mīmāṃsā scholars have formulated rules to draw conclusions from premises and to resolve apparent contradictions. “This is actually closely related with what logicians like us are doing,” says Agata Ciabattoni. “We can formalise such rules in a language that can also be understood by computers.”There is, for example, an old dispute about the “Śyena sacrifice,” a sacrifice in the Vedas meant to kill one’s enemies. How can this be reconciled with the rule not to harm any living being? “For a Hindu, the Vedas are absolutely correct, so there cannot be any contradiction,” says Agata Ciabattoni. In the 7th century, Prabhākara, an Indian philosopher in the Mīmāṃsā tradition resolved this problem by applying several rules from the Vedas in a logically rather complicated way. Various scholars did not believe that his reasoning was correct, and this dispute has been going on for centuries.Agata Ciabattoni and her team closely collaborated with Sanskritists to translate the Mīmāṃsā rules and the Vedic laws into mathematical formulae – and they could prove that Prabhākara had been right all along. Given the prescriptions of the Vedas, Prabhākaras logic was flawless. Mathematical logic settles an old philosophical dispute.Building a Logic System for Ethics”For us, this was a first proof of concept that we can really learn something new by combining Indology and formal logic,” says Agata Ciabattoni. “But ultimately, we want to achieve much more. We want to understand how to formulate with mathematical precision useful logics dealing with prohibitions and obligations.” Citation: Indian sacred texts and the logic of computer ethics (2018, January 29) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-indian-sacred-texts-logic-ethics.html Logic in computer science read more