They want me back and I want to be back Johnson

first_img“They want me back and I want to be back,” Johnson said on Sirius/XM NFL Radio Tuesday night. “You know how the business side goes, though. Everything’s got to be right for both parties and I can’t wait to get back out there.”Johnson took over the starting job early in the season after Andre Ellington went down with an injury, and the veteran made the most of his opportunities. Johnson had four 100-yard games, including a season-high 122 yards rushing in a 26-18 Monday night win over Baltimore in Week 7.After getting released by the Jets last February, Johnson signed for $870,000 in Arizona. But how would the finances look if he were to come back to the desert for a second season?According to Johnson, that contract might be more affordable than you think.“At this point of my career, I’m not really chasing the money,” Johnson said. “I can’t say I was ever really chasing the money. But you know, when you’re a young guy in this league, you want to take care of your family and this and that, you want the highest deal that you can get possible.“But I feel like at this point in time in my career, I want to get the best deal, but at the same time, I want to be somewhere where I have a chance to win. I feel like Arizona is the best place for me right now and when 31 other teams wouldn’t give me an opportunity, they gave me an opportunity. I’m a very loyal guy and my loyalty is with them.” 0 Comments   Share   Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Arizona Cardinals running back Chris Johnson (23) is hit by Baltimore Ravens strong safety Will Hill (33) during the first half of an NFL football game, Monday, Oct. 26, 2015, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) Top Stories It seems like forever since we saw Chris Johnson carry the football for the Arizona Cardinals.Johnson injured his knee in a Week 11 win at San Francisco, and missed the rest of the season. Rookie David Johnson’s emergence also made Chris Johnson, who ran for 814 yards before the injury, a bit of an afterthought as the Cardinals advanced all the way to the NFC Championship Game.Johnson inked a one-year deal in the middle of training camp and is now about to enter free agency once again. After experiencing a bit of a career resurgence in 2015, the running back made his feelings about his future known.center_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo David Johnson, who ran for 442 yards and four touchdowns on 90 carries in the last five regular season games, will be the starter in 2016. But a Johnson and Johnson combination could be an interesting and productive proposition for the Cardinals, who could choose to distance themselves from the often-injured Ellington. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Study of neuroprotective microRNAs may lead to new avenues for treating tauopathies

first_imgAug 2 2018Alzheimer’s disease is an increasingly prevalent, neurodegenerative condition that erodes memory and other cognitive functions. Treatments for this complex disease have been elusive, although researchers have previously uncovered its main biological features: amyloid-beta plaques and tau tangles.A study by researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), recently published in Acta Neuropathologica, investigated lesser-known molecules involved in tauopathies like Alzheimer’s. They focused on microRNAs (miRNAs), gene expression regulators that bind to and destroy protein-encoding messenger RNAs. They discovered that some of these miRNAs showed neuroprotective effects; their supplementation therefore holds potential as a treatment for tauopathies.Related StoriesSlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryThe researchers looked at several miRNAs but focused on miR-132, which previous research has shown is downregulated in Alzheimer’s and other tauopathies. They discovered that miR-132 seemed to protect against toxic amyloid-beta and tau in both rodent models and human neurons.”Our results support the idea that miR-132 is a master regulator of neuronal health with potential as a treatment target,” said lead investigator and BWH scientist, Anna Krichevsky, PhD.The team first looked at primary cortical and hippocampal neurons taken from both normal and tauopathic mice. To examine the neuroprotective properties of naturally occurring miRNAs, they tested 63 neuronal miRNAs, then inhibited them with miRNA-binding molecules called anti-miRNAs. They found that inhibition of some miRNAs seemed to protect against, and others to exacerbate, amyloid-beta pathology and associated glutamate excitotoxicity. Of these, miR-132 was the most neuroprotective miRNA.They confirmed the neuroprotective properties of miR-132 by designing miR-132 mimics and introducing them to the mouse cells. They observed reduced levels of toxic forms of tau, glutamate excitotoxicity and cell death. They also examined miR-132 supplementation in live mice models of human neurodegenerative disease by injecting miR-132 by way of a viral vector. Compared to controls, miR-132-injected mice showed reduced tau pathology and enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation, a process involved in memory formation.When the researchers next introduced miR-132 mimics to human cells, they saw similar results: reduced toxic forms of tau and less cell death.According to Krichevsky, miRNA research offers a fresh perspective in the search for possible Alzheimer’s treatments. MicroRNAs were discovered more recently than mRNAs and proteins, and their complex roles in multiple biological pathways have caused many to doubt that their manipulation could be a viable therapeutic strategy.”Now that we have the knowledge and technologies that enable manipulation of miRNA, we can explore new possibilities,” said Krichevsky. “In the last 30 years, research has focused mostly on amyloid. We’re still hopeful about that approach, but we must invest in new strategies as well.” Source:https://www.brighamandwomens.org/last_img read more