Firefoxs new logo is starting to arrive

first_imgThe new logo features an even more stylized, leg-less version of the fox.  Mozilla; Stephen Shankland/CNET Mozilla has released a new test version of its web browser that introduces the new Firefox logo and drops “Quantum” from its name.Mozilla long ago moved the Firefox icon to a more stylized look, but the newest version is another step away from the original drawing of a fox wrapped around the globe. Even though the fox’s face is now in view and its limbs have vanished, it’s still easily recognized.The new icon arrived over the weekend in version 70 of Firefox Nightly, the incarnation designed for people who want to test the latest features and who can put up with crashes or other problems. Firefox Nightly will settle down into a beta version in coming weeks, then into the main version everyone gets a few weeks after that — Oct. 20, according to Mozilla’s plans. The new logo should follow that course, said Tim Murray, creative director at Mozilla.The logo in Firefox Nightly has a different blue/purple color scheme. The regular Firefox will stick with the red, orange and yellow colors.A simplified new Firefox iconThis is what the regular Firefox logo will look like once today’s Nightly version matures enough for release to everyone. Mozilla The new version also will drop the “Quantum” label Mozilla has attached to the Firefox name since the November 2017 release of Firefox 57, Mozilla said. The Quantum signified a major effort to speed up Firefox to better compete with Google’s Chrome, which dominates browser usage. A number of Quantum programs rebuilt parts of Firefox’s engine, and one such change — the GPU-acclerated Quantum Render technology to display a web page once Firefox figures out what it’s supposed to look like — is still gradually spreading to more computer types. The project also was called WebRender.”Our goal is that WebRender will be the primary rendering engine for the Firefox Browser and we will continue to roll it out to additional platforms throughout the coming months,” said Jessie Bonisteel, a Firefox engineering manager.Mozilla’s newest challenge to Chrome centers on protecting your privacy online — for example, by blocking websites and online ads that try to track you. Chrome has lagged other browsers like Safari, Firefox and Brave in that regard.Firefox usage is gradually decreasing, at least based on statistics Mozilla gathers from people willing to share that data. However, use of Firefox’s new tracking protection is increasing. “Following our release of Enhanced Tracking Protection on by default, we’ve seen our share of users keeping ETP on all the time rise as well,” said Porfirio Landeros, Mozilla’s senior director of product marketing.First published Aug. 12.Update, Aug. 13: Adds more details about the new logo and Firefox’s changes. 1:38 Check out Firefox’s new content-blocking tools Post a comment 0 Firefox Mozillacenter_img Share your voice Computers Tags Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

Experts mixed on whether Obamas goal of 1 million electric cars by

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com 4.7 million EV charging units expected by 2015 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further In its report, the DOE, (backed up by a statement from Assistant Energy Secretary David Sandalow) predicts that sales of plug-in electric (which excludes hybrids) vehicles will be sufficient between now and 2015 to take us over the million mark, to somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.2 million vehicles; more than enough to fulfill the president’s goal.The president’s goal has been widely criticized as far too optimistic, especially in light of the recent recession, and production problems with the Nissan Leaf (partially due to the earthquake/tsunami in Japan) one of the all electric vehicles expected to be among the leading sellers in the near future. Adding to the fire is J.D. Powers, which came out with predictions of just 750,000 electric vehicles by 2015.Other critics have pointed out that the issue is rather moot though, since a million electric vehicles running by 2015, would still account for less than one half of one percent of all operating vehicles by that date. Others however, point out that by passing certain milestones, electric vehicles become ever more of a viable choice for American consumers, thus, paving the way for a boon in sales in later years.What’s not included in either report, unfortunately, due to the time frame in which they were created, is the current cost of gasoline and the possibility that it could reach $5 gallon in this country before the summer is out. While still not nearly as much as consumers are paying in Europe, it could provide a catalyst for change, and swifter acceptance of all-electric vehicles, as consumers find they have few other alternatives.After all is said and done, it appears that despite the massive amounts of money being spent to create their projections, by both government and those in the private sector, there are just too many variables involved to accurately predict where car sales are headed; so, in the end, we’ll all likely just have to wait and see how things develop. Citation: Experts mixed on whether Obama’s goal of 1 million electric cars by 2015 can be reached (2011, April 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-experts-obama-goal-million-electric.html (PhysOrg.com) — A recent report by the Department of Energy (DOE) stating that the United States is well on its way to meeting President Obama’s goal of having at least one million plug-in electric cars and trucks on our nation’s highways and byways by 2015 is in direct conflict with a another recent report from Pike Research suggesting that while worldwide sales of electric vehicles will likely pass the million mark, sales in the United States likely won’t grow fast enough to reach much higher than 850,000 units by that date.last_img read more