Arsenal’s top-four hopes suffer a fresh blow with comprehensive defeat at Leicester

first_imgMichael Oliver sent Ainsley Maitland-Niles off for two bookings in the first half (Getty Images)Arsenal’s first chance of the half arrived after 35 minutes when Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang latched onto a ball forward and teed up Alex Iwobi but his low, left-footed shot from inside the penalty box lacked conviction and was easily saved by Kasper Schmeichel.Less than 60 seconds later and Arsenal were reduced to ten men when Ainsley Maitland-Niles was dismissed for a second bookable offence for a late challenge on Maddison. While Maitland-Niles could have few complaints about his second yellow, his first for another foul on Maddison, looked slightly harsh.Unai Emery was furious with the decision, chucking his coat towards the Arsenal bench shortly after remonstrating with the fourth official. His team remained on the back foot for the remainder of the half, Leno again making a smart stop to deny a low Vardy strike before the break. Eventually, Leicester got their second goal to kill the game five minutes from time as Vardy finally got on the scoresheet. Schmeichel’s booming kick upfield deceived the Arsenal back four with Vardy sprinting onto the loose ball, lobbing a shot off the bar and then nodding in the rebound.In the final minute of injury time, Leicester capped a wonderful performance with their third through Vardy tapping into an empty net following an excellent run and pass from Pereira.AdvertisementAdvertisementMore: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Leicester ran out 3-0 winners over Arsenal at the King Power Stadium (Getty Images)Arsenal’s top-four hopes took another huge dent as they slumped to a third successive Premier League defeat as Leicester City beat them 3-0 at the King Power Stadium.Much has been made of Arsenal’s problems away from home this season and should they fail to make the top-four their results on the road will be a big reason why.Following a couple of half-chances for the hosts, James Maddison came closest to breaking the deadlock on 19 minutes as his low drive from the edge of the area whistled inches past the post, with Bernd Leno relieved to see it end up outside the posts.AdvertisementAdvertisementTen minutes later and Leno was called into action, impressively palming a goal-bound Wilfred Ndidi header to safety after the Nigerian had been picked out by a pinpoint Maddison corner. Shortly after, Jamie Vardy had his first sighter, latching onto a Marc Albrighton long ball before lobbing a volley over the bar.ADVERTISEMENT Youri Tielemans celebrating with James Maddison for Leicester’s opening goal (Getty Images)Laurent Koscielny was introduced at the interval for Iwobi with Mustafi switching to right-back and perhaps in expectation at that change, Brendan Rodgers swapped Ndidi for Harvey Barnes with the 21-year-old taking his place on Leicester’s left flank.Just before the hour mark, Arsenal’s resistance was finally broken. The influential Maddison collected the ball on the right wing and flighted a wonderful cross into the box for Youri Tielemans to run onto and head confidently beyond Leno into the bottom corner. It was the Belgian’s third goal since joining from Monaco in January.Tielemans, who is sure to have his pick of clubs this summer, was inches away from doubling his and Leicester’s lead with 20 minutes remaining with a wonderful effort from distance that flew wide before Ricardo Pereira, Barnes and Maddison drew a triple stop from Leno.8 – Since Brendan Rodgers became Leicester manager, Jamie Vardy has scored more Premier League goals than any other player. Hatful. #LEIARS— OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) April 28, 2019 Arsenal’s top-four hopes suffer a fresh blow with comprehensive defeat at Leicester Comment Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterSunday 28 Apr 2019 1:59 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link252Shares Advertisementlast_img read more

Top stories jellyfish stingers eyeswimming microbots and a metric system makeover

first_img Top stories: jellyfish stingers, eye-swimming microbots, and a metric system makeover Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Jellyfish almost killed this scientist. Now, she wants to save others from their fatal venomAngel Yanagihara of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu has spent 20 years studying the venom of box jellyfish and working to prove their stings exact a much higher death toll than commonly assumed. Her studies have illuminated the biochemical mechanism behind the venom’s lethality and helped her develop products that she says counter the sting. But other jellyfish researchers say different compounds in the venom are the real killers, and that different remedies—or none at all—are better for victims.Watch tiny robots swim through an eyeball to deliver medicine By Frankie SchembriNov. 9, 2018 , 12:40 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email (left to right): ANGEL YANAGIHARA; How The Eye Functions/Prelinger Archive; INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES Although the thought of a swarm of microbots burrowing into an eyeball is enough to make people squirm, researchers have developed spiral-shaped robots tiny enough to pass through dense eyeball jelly. The bots could one day provide a more targeted method of delivering medicine to hard-to-reach areas at the back of the eye.Metric system overhaul will dethrone the one, true kilogramLe Grand K, a gleaming cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy and the world’s standard for mass for more than 130 years, is set to be dethroned as the one, true kilogram. The 26th General Conference on Weights and Measures convenes next week in Versailles, France, and representatives are expected to vote to redefine the International System of Units so that four of its base units—the kilogram, ampere, kelvin, and mole—are defined indirectly, in terms of physical constants that will be fixed by fiat. The rewrite, taking effect in May 2019, aims to make the units more stable and allow investigators to develop ever more precise and flexible techniques to mete them out.Frequent inbreeding may have caused skeletal abnormalities in early humansA new study of fossilized skeletons from across the Middle East and Eurasia found that ancient humans suffered from an unusually high number of birth defects, both debilitating and relatively inconsequential. It’s unclear why such abnormalities seem to be so common, but scientists say one strong possibility is rampant inbreeding among small hunter-gatherer groups.NSF reviewing program that allows graduate fellows to study abroadThe National Science Foundation has pressed pause on the Graduate Research Opportunities Worldwide program, an add-on to the organization’s flagship Graduate Research Fellowship program. NSF says it is “currently reviewing possible future directions” for the program, through which students already receiving the $34,000-a-year fellowship can apply for an additional $5000 allowance to cover travel and living expenses incurred while studying abroad.last_img read more