CPL sensation Shamsi in for injured Badree

first_imgMUMBAI, India, (CMC):South African left-arm spinner Tabraiz Shamsi has been drafted into the Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) squad for the rest of the season to replace injured West Indies leg-spinner Samuel Badree.The 26-year-old, who has played 68 first-class matches but is yet to represent South Africa, has gone straight into the final XI for RCB’s game yesterday against Rising Pune Supergiants.Badree sustained a shoulder injury in the final of the Twenty20 World Cup in Kolkata earlier this month against England and has failed to recover.”RCB is pleased to have signed in SA’s left-arm chinaman bowler Tabraiz Shamsi for injured Badree,” RCB chairman Amrit Thomas said.”He is highly skillful, with a lot of variations, and has had success in SA’s domestic cricket as well as in the CPL this year. While we will miss Samuel Badree, we are excited about the variety that Shamsi brings to our bowling attack.”Shamsi is known to Caribbean fans, having proved a sensation in the Caribbean Premier League last season, snatching 11 wickets for new boys St Kitts and Nevis Patriots.Badree, meanwhile, is the second West Indies player to be forced out of the IPL with injury after fellow Trinidadian Lendl Simmons was also ruled out for Mumbai Indians with a back injury.last_img read more

More Tangled Branches that Confound Darwinian Trees

first_img(Visited 335 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Darwin’s branching “tree of life” diagram made for a nice, simple, easy-to-understand, convenient myth. It has sent scientists on a wild tree chase ever since.MitochondriaRedefining the origin of the cellular powerhouse (Science Daily). Mitochondria produce most of the energy for the cell. That’s where the ATP synthase rotary engines work to generate ATP at the end of a chain of complex molecular machines. You may have heard the evolutionists’ favorite story for the origin of mitochondria, the ‘endosymbiont’ theory. This claims that mitochondria are evolutionary remnants of a microbe that ingested another microbe that knew how to run the powerhouse, and the two lived happily ever after. What you may not have heard is that there is a “fierce debate” that has raged between evolutionists about the details of this account.Evidence from the past few decades strongly supports that mitochondria evolved via endosymbiosis, a process in which a free-living bacterium is taken up by a host cell. Yet, both the identity of the mitochondrial ancestor, as well as the nature of the endosymbiosis, are subject of fierce debates.The Darwinists at the University of Uppsala decided to enter the debate and see if they could understand the reasons for it.“We believe that there are two main reasons for the lack of consensus on the identity of the mitochondrial ancestor,” says Thijs Ettema, researcher at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Uppsala University who led the team conducting the study. “First, it is possible that present-day relatives simply have not been found yet — if they even still exist. Second, the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the mitochondria is extremely challenging, and can easily lead to very different and hence conflicting results.“Their divination efforts may only increase tensions, because their proposed common ancestor is not even a member of the most popular candidate group, the Alphaproteobacteria. Where did the ancestor go? It seems to have disappeared into the misty realms of the unobservable past. Ratcheting up the perhapsimaybecouldness index, they speculate freely:Unexpectedly, their analyses supported a new position of mitochondria, which were now placed outside of the Alphaproteobacteria.These results indicate that mitochondria are not the closest relatives to any of the currently recognized alphaproteobacterial groups, including the Rickettsiales. Rather, the mitochondria evolved from an ancestor which later gave rise to all currently recognized Alphaproteobacteria.“We suspect that the popular Rickettsiales-related ancestry of mitochondria is the result of a methodological artefact.” explains Martijn. “Mitochondria and Rickettsiales have evolved under very similar conditions, which could have resulted in very similar but independent modes of evolution and sequence patterns. This in turn may have complicated previous efforts to determine the evolutionary origin of mitochondria.”The study failed to identify any present-day relatives of the mitochondrial ancestor.Disappointed, the researchers hope the ancestor will be found some day in Tomorrowland.SpidersPhylogenomics, Diversification Dynamics, and Comparative Transcriptomics across the Spider Tree of Life (Current Biology). In this paper, seven Darwinians tried really hard to get spiders to fit into a Darwinian tree. They claim success:Photo by David Coppedge.Dating back to almost 400 mya, spiders are among the most diverse terrestrial predators. However, despite considerable effort, their phylogenetic relationships and diversification dynamics remain poorly understood. Here, we use a synergistic approach to study spider evolution through phylogenomics, comparative transcriptomics, and lineage diversification analyses. Our analyses, based on ca. 2,500 genes from 159 spider species, reject a single origin of the orb web (the “ancient orb-web hypothesis”) and suggest that orb webs evolved multiple times since the late Triassic–Jurassic. We find no significant association between the loss of foraging webs and increases in diversification rates, suggesting that other factors (e.g., habitat heterogeneity or biotic interactions) potentially played a key role in spider diversification. Finally, we report notable genomic differences in the main spider lineages: while araneoids (ecribellate orb-weavers and their allies) reveal an enrichment in genes related to behavior and sensory reception, the retrolateral tibial apophysis (RTA) clade—the most diverse araneomorph spider lineage—shows enrichment in genes related to immune responses and polyphenic determination. This study, one of the largest invertebrate phylogenomic analyses to date, highlights the usefulness of transcriptomic data not only to build a robust backbone for the Spider Tree of Life, but also to address the genetic basis of diversification in the spider evolutionary chronicle.If you read past the confident claims, you notice that up till now this family tree has been “poorly understood” and can only be reconciled with tricks of the tree-building trade, including novel placements, convergent evolution [Darwin Flubber] and storytelling (“the spider evolutionary chronicle”). Surely orb-web building is one of the most complex phenomena in zoology, requiring both incredible expertise in materials science and in behavior. Can anyone really accept their claim that “orb webs evolved multiple times” without comparing it to belief in miracles?YeastGenome evolution across 1,011 Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates (Nature). This paper talks about another huge tree-building effort, but it’s just for one species: the common yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast has been an important organism for people groups, involved as it is in the making of bread and beer. The 21 authors looked for differences in over a thousand members of this one-celled eukaryote and found some interesting things:Large-scale population genomic surveys are essential to explore the phenotypic diversity of natural populations. Here we report the whole-genome sequencing and phenotyping of 1,011 Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates, which together provide an accurate evolutionary picture of the genomic variants that shape the species-wide phenotypic landscape of this yeast. Genomic analyses support a single ‘out-of-China’ origin for this species, followed by several independent domestication events. Although domesticated isolates exhibit high variation in ploidy, aneuploidy and genome content, genome evolution in wild isolates is mainly driven by the accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms. A common feature is the extensive loss of heterozygosity, which represents an essential source of inter-individual variation in this mainly asexual species. Most of the single nucleotide polymorphisms, including experimentally identified functional polymorphisms, are present at very low frequencies. The largest numbers of variants identified by genome-wide association are copy-number changes, which have a greater phenotypic effect than do single nucleotide polymorphisms.Sanford’s book examines the impact of mutations that are invisible to selection.What they found is a surprising lack of evolution. The biggest differences were single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are neutral mutations. As John Sanford explained in his book Genetic Entropy, the accumulation of neutral or nearly-neutral mutations puts a mutational load on any genome, scrambling the original information and degrading it. Undoubtedly lineages went extinct that degraded too much, or did not survive in the first place. The other major change observed in the study was copy-number changes, including aneuploidy (chromosome duplications), which do not create new information.Nothing in the study claimed yeast made evolutionary progress in any way. There were no innovations or cases of positive selection mentioned. Evidence of “purifying selection” was mentioned, but that results from repair mechanisms in the cell that try to get rid of bad mutations—an example of intelligent design.While it’s helpful to perform genetic studies such as this to tease out effects of mutations and domestication, no Darwinian evolution was observed. No mutations were selected for a fitter kind of yeast. In the end, the “tree of life” for all 1,011 isolates were still yeast. Not only that, they were still one species of yeast: Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where in any of these examples do we see the Origin of Species by Natural Selection?See also yesterday’s entry for three other examples of tree-building exercises by Darwinians. The results in both these entries would do nothing to convince an impartial observer to believe that bacteria evolved into humans.last_img read more

Linder elected to serve National Corn Board

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest John Linder of Edison, Ohio was elected to serve on the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) board for a three-year term during Corn Congress.Linder is a 5th generation grain farmer with years of experience working on behalf of corn and agriculture.“I am honored to serve this industry that is so important to my family and our country,” Linder said. “For me, it is all about giving back,” he said. “Agriculture has been so good to us, and my family has been able to enjoy farming for many years. We feel very bullish about agriculture still and love farming. The opportunity to give back and see a future for our children is motivation enough.”During his three-year term, he will combine hands-on leadership experience that he has gained from his current and past leadership experiences. Linder is a board member of the Ohio Corn Checkoff and recently served a two-year term as chairman.Linder was elected during Corn Congress, a national policy meeting where farmer delegates of the respective corn state associations discuss grassroots policy. Corn Congress allows farmers to speak directly with representation in the U.S. House and U.S. Senate.The NCGA Corn Board is a 15-member board representing America’s corn industry charged with implementing the policies that guide the organization to best serve U.S. corn farmers. Board members represent the federation of state organizations, and acts as spokesmen to enhance the organization’s public standing.last_img read more

ChinaLed Consortium Chosen to Build LNG Terminal in Cyprus

first_imgzoomIllustration; Source: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license A consortium led by China Petroleum Pipeline Engineering Corporation (CPPEC) has been selected as the preferred bidder for the construction of an LNG terminal at Vassiliko Port in Cyprus.The consortium, comprising Wilhelmsen Ship Management Limited, Aktor S.A., Metron S.A. and Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding, is to build the LNG import terminal that includes a floating storage regasification unit (FSRU), a jetty for the mooring of the FSRU, jetty borne and onshore pipelines as well as additional facilities.The consortium will now be invited in Cyprus, in order to finalize the process and sign the contracts with ETYFA (Natural Gas Infrastructure Company).Symeon Kassianides, Chairman of Cyprus Natural Gas Public Company (DEFA), was cited as saying that, if the procedure goes according to plan, contracts with the preferred bidder would be signed in mid-October 2019.The EUR 300 million project, scheduled for completion in 2021, is co-financed by a grant of 40%, or up to EUR 101 million, from the European Union’s Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) financing instrument.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

The first words of Muriel on his return to Italy

first_imgColombian forward Luis Muriel is back in the Italian Lega Serie A, and as soon as he landed he spoke about how he feels now with Fiorentina.Colombian forward Luis Muriel has returned to the Italian Lega Serie A.The 27-year-old already knows the league, having played there with Udinese, Lecce, and Sampdoria.But he spent more than one year and a half with Sevilla in the Spanish La Liga.And now he signed with Fiorentina on a one-year loan with an option to buy him.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“I am really happy to be here,” he told Gianluca Di Marzio.“I gave my word to [director of football Pantaleo] Corvino.”“I can’t wait to get on the field,” he said with a smile.“It is nice to return to Italy and it is a league that I know well.”last_img read more

Star Trek 4 movie reportedly shelved but more shows on the way

first_imgEnlarge ImageThe cinematic future of the Star Trek Enterprise looks a bit grim. Paramount Pictures While Star Trek: Discovery is impressing fans with an extra dose of “action, wit and color,” it looks like the Star Trek 4 movie has been put on hold indefinitely. (Disclosure: CBS is CNET’s parent company.)Star Trek’s first female director, S.J. Clarkson, is jumping off the Enterprise to direct the upcoming HBO’s Game of Thrones prequel series, Deadline reported Tuesday. In August 2018, the Hollywood Reporter reported that Chris Pine and Chris Hemsworth (who played Kirk’s father in the 2009 Star Trek film) might not rejoin the series due to contract problems. With both the director gone and two of the stars walking away due to salary disputes, Star Trek 4 sadly won’t be engaging audiences anytime soon. Paramount Pictures didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.  But Star Trek fans shouldn’t feel too distraught. In addition to Star Trek: Discovery, fans also have more than one new animated series to look forward to.On Tuesday, producer and writer Alex Kurtzman told The Hollywood Reporter there’ll be a “minimum of two” animated series as he continues to build out the Star Trek franchise.In addition to Star Trek: Lower Decks (the half-hour animated comedy from Rick and Morty producer Mike McMahan), CBS All Access has ordered two more installments of shortform series Star Trek: Short Treks. If that’s not enough new Star Trek shows for fans, there’s also the Patrick Stewart-led untitled Picard series, a Star Trek: Discovery spinoff starring Michelle Yeoh, and The Starfleet Academy from producers Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage in the works.Season 2 of Discovery premieres on CBS All Access in the US on Jan. 17, and on Netflix around the world. The new season begins with an episode titled Brother, which picks up right where season 1 left off with the arrival of the Enterprise. 14 Photos Tags Share your voice Culture: Your hub for everything from film and television to music, comics, toys and sports.Star Trek: Discovery taps classic fun for new season: From the return of Spock to the lighter tone, this IS your father’s Star Trek. Star Trek: Discovery cast members on the tech they’d phase-blast away How Star Trek: Discovery’s Spock differs from the classic Nimoy take Star Trek: Lower Decks have you excited? Give the ’70s cartoon a try TV and Movies Every Star Trek: Discovery season 2 photo so far Comments Game of Thrones HBO CBS Star Trek Netflix 14 More Star Treklast_img read more

HISD Board Approves 20162017 Budget With 84 Million In Cuts

first_img X Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /00:00 Al OrtizFrom left to right: Ken Huewitt, HISD interim superintendent; board president Manuel Rodriguez and board member Wanda Adams during the public hearing held to vote on the budget for school year 2016-17.The Houston Independent School District board approved the budget for the 2016-2017 school year.Texas now considers HISD a wealthy district due to rising property values and that means the district has to reimburse the state approximately $162 million through a mechanism called recapture.The budget for the next school year contains $84 million in cuts to balance this situation, which is happening for the first time in HISD’s history.The cuts will result in the district eliminating 80 administrative positions, as well as doing away with the Apollo program and ending teachers’ bonuses.Some members of the board criticized the state’s system to fund public schools and interim Superintendent Ken Huewitt said reforms are needed.“We can kind of move forward and start dealing with this recapture issue because this is not something that we have to deal with every year, we’ve got to get this changed,” Huewitt said at the end of the public hearing held to approve the budget.The budget was passed by five votes to two.Trustees Manuel Rodríguez, Wanda Adams, Rhonda Skillern-Jones, Jolanda Jones and Michael Lunceford voted in favor of the budget, while Greg Meyers and Anna Eastman voted against it.Trustees Harvin Moore and Diana Dávila were not present at the time of the vote. Listenlast_img read more

UNIGLOBE Travel announces new partner agency agency renewal

first_imgUNIGLOBE Travel announces new partner agency & agency renewal Travelweek Group Friday, July 26, 2019 Share TORONTO — UNIGLOBE Travel has added Voyages Concierge Deluxe Travel & Voyages Westmount Travel in Montreal as its newest Partner Agency in Eastern Canada.Owned by Tony Fragapane, who has worked in the travel industry since 1972, and his wife Maria Viviano Urso, Voyages Concierge is comprised of 70% Corporate and 30% Leisure, with a high-end cruise department. It’s also one of Air Canada’s Circle of Excellence agencies.In addition, McTavish Travel has signed a multi-year renewal of its UNIGLOBE partner agency agreement. McTavish, the first agency to join the UNIGLOBE Partner Program back in April, is a full-service Travel Management Company that serves corporate, non-profit, leisure and group travel.On these latest developments, Dean Dacko, Regional President, UNIGLOBE Travel (Eastern Canada), said: “These announcements strongly represent the continued strength of the UNIGLOBE Travel brand in Canada. UNIGLOBE continues to grow and succeed in a very competitive market by providing a leading edge technology solution, combined with highly effective client support tools that exceed customer expectations, and drives the growth of our business in Canada.”center_img Tags: UNIGLOBE, Voyages Concierge Deluxe Travel, Voyages Westmount Travel Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more