Stars Help Raise £435054 At UNICEF UK Halloween Ball

first_imgUNICEF UK Ambassadors and High Profile Supporters Rita Ora, Sir Chris Hoy, Martin Bell and Emma Willis led this week’s fantastical turn out for Unicef UK’s ‘Twisted Tales’ Halloween Ball raising £435,054 to support Unicef’s life-saving work for children in danger around the world.The bold and the beautiful descended on London’s Banqueting House for a Halloween experience like no other, with an interactive “twisted tales” themed champagne reception, a Beauty and the Feast dinner, and stellar performances from BRIT-award-winning Neneh Cherry and Unicef UK supporter Rita Ora.Dinner guests heard from Unicef UK Ambassador Sir Chris Hoy about the vital work made possible by generous donations to Unicef, and guests pledged their support at a money-can’t-buy auction – with lots including a starring role in David Walliams’ new book, an exclusive visit to the set of The Crown with Unicef UK supporter Olivia Colman, and a velodrome cycling experience with Sir Chris Hoy.Guests at the prestigious event also included Cel Spellman, Emma and Matt Willis, Ade Adepitan, Zeinab Badawi, and Lord Sebastian Coe.Guest performer and Unicef UK supporter Rita Ora said: “It is such an honour to be here on behalf of Unicef UK tonight and I am so proud to be able to give my time to such an incredible evening. It’s not often you get to perform at an event which really will make such a huge difference, and as a supporter of the charity or many years I know the money raised this evening really will help those children around the world most in need. It’s been such a fun evening performing for everyone, and it was so incredible to see how many people gave so generously.”Unicef UK Executive Director, Mike Penrose said, “I’m absolutely thrilled at the huge amount raised from this evening’s Halloween Ball. The money raised tonight will enable Unicef to deliver results for every child – especially those in the greatest need and in the hardest to reach areas. There has never been a more vital time for your support, and we are incredibly grateful to everyone who attended and gave so generously this evening.”The money raised at Unicef UK’s Halloween Ball will help Unicef, the world’s leading children’s organisation, support children in danger around the world. Since 2013, Unicef UK’s annual Halloween Ball has raised more than £4 million to support Unicef’s work.last_img read more

Fans stand by Hedley as tour goes on amid sexual misconduct allegations

first_img Twitter HALIFAX—The band has been dropped by their management team, tour openers and dozens of radio stations, but concertgoers say they are standing by Hedley as the besieged pop-rockers continue to perform across the country in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations that they have steadfastly denied.Fans screamed until they were out of breath during Hedley’s lively performance at Halifax’s Scotiabank Centre on Friday.Frontman Jacob Hoggard thanked Hedley fans from the “bottom of our hearts” for being the people the band could always rely on, but did not directly address the anonymous allegations of inappropriate behaviour involving young fans that have emerged on social media in recent weeks. Advertisement Login/Register With: The Canadian Press, which normally does not pay to cover live events, purchased a ticket to Friday’s show after representatives for Hedley only offered press credentials for the first three songs of the band’s performance.Band representatives said Hedley is not giving interviews at this time. Hedley has called the allegations “unsubstantiated” in a statement earlier this month. Facebook “To everybody … who has stood behind us all of these years — through the ups and the downs, through the highs and the lows, the good times and the bad — Halifax, we could never, ever imagine doing this without you,” Hoggard told the crowd over anthemic music.“Because sometimes life sucks, and that’s why we’ve got you. And, Halifax, sometimes life sucks, but that’s why you’ve got us. Stay in our lives, and I promise we’ll stay in yours.” Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment A fan wearing a t-shirt for the rock group Hedley attends the band’s concert in Halifax Friday night. (DARREN CALABRESE / THE CANADIAN PRESS) Advertisementlast_img read more

MONTREALS QUEEN OF TAP SAYS GOODBYE TO DANCE SCHOOL IN DORVAL

first_imgAdvertisement Ethel Bruneau’s tap school is something of an institution, not just in Dorval, but in the wider Montreal dance community.Bruneau, who is now 82, casts a long shadow and has had a hand in teaching hundreds, if not thousands, of young people and adults during her career.This month she’s closing another chapter, as she bids farewell to the dance school she’s run in Dorval for the last 14 years. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Bruneau says the rent on her studio is just too high, and student enrollment in dance classes isn’t what it used to be.“I don’t have the students that I had. Kids aren’t dancing like they used to. There used to be 200, 300 kids in here. Now I’m down to about five,” she said. Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: Ethel Bruneau opened her first dance school in 1959 in Dorion, Que. Now she’s being forced to close her school in Dorval because she can no longer afford the rent. (CBC) Twitterlast_img read more

LILLY SINGH IS CHANGING LATE NIGHT TV FOREVER

first_img Twitter LILLY SINGH IS CHANGING LATE NIGHT TV FOREVERLate-night TV has undergone a lot of changes in the past several years, and fans can thank several innovative new voices for the new, fresh landscape. One of these innovators is Lilly Singh, a YouTube star who has achieved a massive amount of success in the past few years.Singh was even named as one of the forty most powerful people in comedy for the year 2019. Recently, Singh unveiled some exciting news that sent her fanbase into a tizzy. READ MORELilly-Singh (Photo by Alexandra Gavillet for The Hollywood Reporter)LILLY SINGH, THE FIRST OPENLY BISEXUAL WOMAN OF COLOR TALK SHOW HOST, ON IMPACT OF COMING OUTLilly Singh’s coming out has made an impact with her fans. Singh, the Indian-Canadian YouTube comedian with nearly 15 million subscribers who is now replacing Carson Daly on NBC late-night, announced the career move in March. A month earlier, she came out as bisexual, making her the first openly bisexual woman of color talk show host.In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Singh discussed the positive effect her coming out has had on even conservative audiences. “The very next meet-and-greet that I did after coming out was in India, and I would say 50 percent of people in that line came out to me,” she said. “To me, that is success.” READ MORELILLY SINGH: FROM YOUTUBE SUPERWOMAN TO NBC LATE NIGHT TV TRAILBLAZERAn online star with 15 million subscribers dives into the white-hot center (emphasis on white) of broadcast television with ‘A Little Late’ as the first openly bisexual woman of color to sit in a talk show host’s chair: “I’m very much all or nothing.”When Lilly Singh runs a pitch meeting, she comes bearing gifts. “Live your best life in the office — you don’t have to wear shoes!” she announces to the writers she’s assembled on this scorching August afternoon in a drab conference room off Melrose Avenue in Hollywood, where they’ll be discussing ideas for her new NBC late night show, A Little Late, which premieres Sept. 16. She proceeds to toss out pairs of fluffy white unicorn slippers. READ MORE Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement NBC SETS ‘A LITTLE LATE WITH LILLY SINGH: THE PRIMETIME SPECIAL’ TO INTRODUCE LATE NIGHT’S NEWEST VOICETwo days after the premiere of A Little Late with Lilly Singh, NBC will air a primetime special that puts the spotlight on the newest face of late night.On September 18 after the two-hour finale of America’s Got Talent, the hour-long primetime special will introduce primetime audiences to Singh as she partakes in sketches, interviews, games and interacts with the audience. READ MORE Advertisementlast_img read more

Saskatchewans main First Nation organization backs Conservative bill to make band politician

first_imgAPTN National NewsThis week the federal government tabled the First Nations Financial Transparency Act.It would require all First Nations to make public the salaries of their chief and council.It would also make financial statements of their operations accessible to the public.The Federation of Saskatchewan Indians says it welcomes the transparency and accountability it will bring.They hope how, the government will spend their time and energy on addressing important issues like housing, education and safe drinking water.In the past, the FSIN has repeatedly called for a First Nations auditor general’s office.last_img read more

A mothers journey from the jail cell

first_imgAPTN National NewsMany Aboriginal women coming out of the prison system find it next to impossible to transition back into society.That’s why a new centre opened its doors in Winnipeg.APTN National News reporter Tiar Wilson has this story.last_img

Chaos ends Missing Womens Inquiry

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Missing Women’s Inquiry ended as it began. In chaos.Protesters barged into the proceedings to voice their displeasure with the commission.Commissioner Wally Oppal asked for patience, saying the report isn’t even written yet.The day ended, however, with a possible show of reconciliation.APTN National News reporter Rob Smith has this story.last_img

Transport Canada monitoring Wasaya Airways after major safety violations uncovered

first_imgBy Kenneth Jackson and Cullen CrozierAPTN InvestigatesFirst Nation-owned Wasaya Airways is under the watch of Transport Canada inspectors after the company was found to be violating “major” components of their safety management system (SMS) during an inspection in 2013, APTN Investigates has learned.But an aviation expert says the northern Ontario company should have been immediately grounded and described their safety management system as in “shambles” based on a Transport Canada inspection report obtained by APTN.A team of Transport Canada inspectors descended on the Wasaya headquarters in Thunder Bay last March and spent about a week poring over the company’s SMS dating back a year to April 2012 according to the report.It was determined the airway, that serves remote First Nations in northern Ontario, to be in “non-conformance” in six different key elements relating to SMS, a regulatory requirement airways in Canada adhere to.Inspectors found staff didn’t know how to file safety reports, the main base in Thunder Bay had no carry-on sizing device, neither did sub-base Sioux Lookout, an emergency response plan hadn’t been updated since 2010 and none of the staff interviewed by Transport Canada were trained on it.An armed peace officer was also allowed to fly without documentation and without crew members knowing he was carrying a live weapon. There was also multiple issues with de-icing policies.To see the complete report click here.“There were indications employees had started to lose respect for the process and to question their supervisor’s commitment or their ability to bring about change. There were several gaps in functionally related elements which will cause the system to continue to break down,” the report said referring to how the SMS was implemented.Management then got a failing grade from Transport Canada or a “major” deficiency.“Staff did not understand what they were responsible for, people (were) not completing their duties and staff (was) not being held responsible for items under their control,” the report states.Dave Winter used to conduct aviation inspections for Transport Canada until he retired in 2010. APTN asked him to review the assessment of Wasaya and give his expert opinion.He described Wasaya as being in complete shambles regarding their safety reporting.“I would have suspended their operating certificate,” said Winter, who had planes grounded during his more than 30 years with Transport Canada. “To me that means there is something seriously wrong with the company. It’s up to Transport Canada to do something about that.”Transport Canada didn’t take Wasaya out of the air.Rather Wasaya was ordered to make adjustments and submit a report saying the changes had been made – known as a Corrective Action Plan.According to the report the plan was to be filed by June 17, 2013. It was filed in July.Transport Canada refused to provide a copy of Wasaya’s plan or speak about the company citing privacy reasons.Winter said if Transport Canada wasn’t going to ground the planes then the feds should have followed up with surprise inspections and went undercover on flights to ensure safety of passengers was being met.“I’d be putting those guys under pretty much constant surveillance,” said Winter. “I’d be watching them every day.”Transport Canada did say they have visited Wasaya twice since March 2013, but it’s not clear if one of those times was the initial inspection. They also said they’ll continue to monitor Wasaya but wouldn’t say how.They also said they conducted 11 inspections between 2001 and February 2013. Transport Canada didn’t respond in a timely fashion to a follow up question on how previous inspections missed what they determined to be major deficiencies in safety.Wasaya eventually refused to comment on “internal matters” and said it’s a private company accountable to the First Nations that own the airway.President Tom Morris initially offered to pay for an APTN reporter to fly to Thunder Bay and meet his staff. He would also pay for accommodations. He then offered to fly to Ottawa and meet with APTN before sending a letter declining any comment.Airways in Canada basically regulate themselves after Transport Canada begin implementing the SMS requirement in 2005. It’s one of the reasons why Winters retired. He didn’t think SMS went far enough to protect passengers and said he witnessed enforcement be scaled back.The systems allow for a company to establish, maintain and adhere to their own SMS.Federal inspectors then review the overall system.The expectation is the company will conduct internal audits and verify employees understand SMS to ensure it’s working.Transport Canada said they are satisfied with the changes Wasaya has made but their own report suggests management doesn’t always follow up on “Corrective Action Plans.”Winter said from his experience when airways are found not following safety rules they make it look like things will change but follow ups showed many times they didn’t.“When they get caught doing something like that they’ll put on the appearance that they’re doing something, but once the surveillance is done they go back to their old ways,” he said.That’s why he said it’s important Transport Canada continue to monitor Wasaya, at least to ensure the protection of passengers is being done.Wasaya is owned by 12 northern Ontario First Nations. Multiple chiefs said they had no knowledge of the Transport Canada report and asked that it be faxed to them.In 2003, eight people died when a Wasaya plane crashed heading to Summer Beaver First Nation.kjackson@aptn.caccrozier@aptn.calast_img read more

Traditional Harvester tries to keep ricing ‎tradition going

first_imgAnnette Francis APTN National NewsIt’s that time of year again for the season harvest of wild rice.That tradition has been carried on for hundreds of years.But it hasn’t been easy.Many people around the lakes where it’s grown mistake rice for weeds.And that isn’t going over well.afrancis@aptn.calast_img

Brown tap water has members of Potlotek boiling over – but really

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsFor decades, the Mi’kmaq who live in Potlotek First Nation in Nova Scotia have struggled with poor water – from boil water advisories to muddy water coming out of the taps.Indigenous Affairs is working on a fix but not fast enough for the community.And now frustration is boiling over.Find more here: Watertroache@aptn.calast_img

Cornwallis statue removal marks historic day for Mikmaq

first_imgJustin Brake APTN NewsAn eagle circled overhead as the statue of Edward Cornwallis came down Wednesday in Halifax.For hours members of the Mi’kmaq community and others watched as workers sawed and hammed away at the feet of the bronze statue erected almost 90 years ago to commemorate the city’s founder.They cheered when a crane lifted the large bust off a stone pedestal and onto the back of a truck to be taken away and put into storage indefinitely.Workers spent hours cutting and chipping away at the bronze statue in an effort to separate it from the stone pedestal it was placed on.In a 12-4 vote on Tuesday Halifax Regional Council voted to immediately remove the statue and continue with plans to form an expert panel that will include appointed Mi’kmaq representatives to determine the fate of the controversial statue.Cornwallis issued bounties on Mi’kmaq scalps in 1749 and 1750 while establishing a barracks at Halifax.For at least three decades Mi’kmaq have called for the statue’s removal, many arguing that a man who incited genocide against their ancestors should not be publicly celebrated, and that the statue’s prominence in downtown Halifax is a constant reminder of the pain, suffering and colonization endured by Mi’kmaq for hundreds of years.Tensions rose last July after five Canadian military personnel identifying as members of the Proud Boys interrupted an Indigenous mourning ceremony at the Cornwallis statue.Many Indigenous-led ceremonies and protests in recent months and years have been met with public displays of racism by settlers who some say reject facts and narratives that challenge Eurocentric perspectives of Canada’s history.Council’s decision to remove the statue came days after the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs announced it was pulling its support for the establishment of the panel to review the city’s commemoration of Cornwallis. The chiefs said the process of forming the committee was taking too long.After years of debate and previous votes against removing the statue, on Tuesday some Halifax councillors admitted changing their position on the matter after researching Mi’kmaq history and reading the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission report.“I look at the 500 years of broken promises since Europeans first arrived and settled on these shores. And those 500 years have been rife with disease, strife, broken treaties, broken promises, hidden agendas, military action — and circumstances which beggar the imagination to the point where a true decimation occurred in North America,” Councillor Richard Zurawski said in an impassioned speech.“If we want reconciliation, we pull down the statue immediately,” he continued. “We don’t discuss putting it someplace else. We don’t discuss temporary measures. For goodness sakes, let’s end the 500 years of broken promises and take away this visible symbol of supremacy.”Following the vote Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief Morley Googoo said he hopes other municipalities across Canada are paying attention.“I think there’s a huge opportunity here for the City of Halifax to show how other municipalities across the country are dealing with the very same question, about how do they have relationships with Indigenous people,” he said.The statue of Edward Cornwallis is hoisted by a crane and placed on the bed of a truck before being taken away and put into storage. In the coming months an expert panel that will include members of the Mi’kmaq community will discuss the statue’s future.By the end of the day Tuesday posters appeared on benches and light poles in the statue’s vicinity at Cornwallis Park. They read “Save Our Statue” and contained a QR code linking to a Facebook community page that contains comments denying genocide ever occurred against the Mi’kmaq.Elder Daniel Paul, author of acclaimed Mi’kmaq history book “We Were Not The Savages,” said he “fully expected there’s going to be white supremacists coming out of the woodwork,” but that he does “hope that the majority of Nova Scotia is going to be supportive of reconciliation.”By Wednesday morning the posters had been removed, and there were no protests or visible dissent during the statue’s removal.Rebecca Cope-Moore (centre) looks for an eagle soaring above as others watch workers remove the Edward Cornwallis statue in Halifax Wednesday.Rebecca Cope-Moore, a Mi’kmaw activist and member of Pictou Landing First Nation who has long advocated for the statue’s removal, said it was “surreal” to watch Cornwallis come down Wednesday.A seventh-generation descendant of former Mi’kmaw leader Jean-Baptiste Cope, a signatory of the British-Mi’kmaq 1752 Peace and Friendship treaty, Cope-Moore said she felt she was watching a prophecy unfold. Rebecca Cope-Moore, member of Pictou Landing First Nation, describing the moment when an eagle flew over the area as the Cornwallis statue was being removed.“I was here to witness that moment along with my sister and lots of community members. And when Cornwallis came down an eagle flew over—right over all of us—and that’s not common here in the city to see them too often,” she said.“So for that eagle to come and fly right over us, right at the same moment as Cornwallis got removed from his pedestal, was just — it was very affirming to me.”Halifax Regional Council will now continue its effort to form the expert panel to review the city’s commemoration of Cornwallis and to make recommendations on what to do with the statue.Eagle did one low circle above #Cornwallis and the crowd gathered here in Halifax at the moment the statue was being laid down on the bed of the truck. The statue was then covered with a tarp and will be taken away and put into storage indefinitey. @APTNNews pic.twitter.com/OZUAU8Oo9Q— Justin Brake (@JustinBrakeNews) January 31, 2018last_img read more

Alberta child welfare survivor pens book about his experience with the system

first_imgChris StewartAPTN NewsA young Alberta man who survived abuse in the child welfare system is fighting to have a life and writing a book about his experiences.At the age of four, Steven Morin was put in child welfare.Throughout his life, he has battled drug and alcohol addictions.Now he’s writing a book about how he survived with the hope that he can help others.cstewart@aptn.ca@aptnchrislast_img

Starbucks citing ocean threat is ditching plastic straws from all locations

first_imgVANCOUVER – Vancouver Starbucks locations will be the first in Canada to serve drinks without plastic straws as it works to eliminate the product from all its stores by 2020, the company announced Monday.The coffee chain is the latest big company to acknowledge the environmental threat plastic straws pose and promise to implement an alternative in the face of mounting public pressure.There’s been a tipping point in the public’s awareness that plastic is a global problem, said environmental lawyer David Boyd.A video showing a turtle with a plastic straw stuck in its nose received more than 30 million views on YouTube, for example, said Boyd, who also teaches at the University of British Columbia.Companies like Starbucks are responding to that surge in environmental concern.Starbucks will make a strawless lid or straws made from alternative materials, like paper of compostable plastic, available at its more than 28,000 stores worldwide by 2020. It has created a strawless lid that will be standard for its iced coffee, tea and espresso drinks.“This is a significant milestone to achieve our global aspiration of sustainable coffee, served to our customers in more sustainable ways,” CEO Kevin Johnson said in a statement.The strawless lid is currently available in more than 8,000 Canadian and U.S. locations for some beverages.The Seattle-based company will implement the lids for all cold, non-blended drinks first at its hometown and Vancouver locations this fall, with phased rollouts within the U.S. and Canada to follow next year. A global rollout of the strawless lids will follow, beginning in Europe where the will be used in select stores in France and the Netherlands, as well as in the United Kingdom.It’s the largest food and beverage company to do so as calls to cut waste globally grow louder and plastic straws have become one of the most prominent targets.“I think that straws are just widely seen as kind of the low-hanging fruit,” said Boyd.Some cities, including Seattle and Fort Myers Beach in Florida, have banned plastic straws. Vancouver will prohibit plastic straws as well as some other items by June 1, 2019 as part of the Zero Waste 2040 Strategy.Similar proposals are being considered in places like New York and San Francisco, as well as by the European Union.The issue is coming up in company boardrooms, partly in response to changing municipal regulations and partly due to growing consumer pressure.McDonald’s shareholders voted down a proposal requesting a report on plastic straws in May.However, McDonald’s recently said it would switch to paper straws in the United Kingdom and Ireland by next year, and test alternatives to plastic straws in some U.S. locations.In Canada, McDonald’s has said it planned to monitor the market tests to understand the impact the changes may have before making any specific decisions. A company spokeswoman did not respond to questions about whether the company planned to do any testing in Canada and did not provide a timeline for implementing any changes.Rival burger chain A&W Food Services of Canada Inc. has said it will eliminate all plastic straws from its restaurants by the end of this year.Ikea recently announced it would eliminate single-use plastic products from its shelves by 2020, including straws. Canadian restaurant chain owner Recipe Unlimited Corporation, formerly known as Cara Operations, and its 19 brands will phase out using plastic straws by the end of March 2019.But banning the drinking instruments is only the tip of the iceberg, said Boyd, and does not solve the global problem of plastic pollution.Plastic drinking straws make up only about four per cent of the plastic trash by number of pieces, and far less by weight.A stronger, more comprehensive response is needed, he said, and called on Canada’s federal government to develop a national plastic waste strategy.In April, environment minister Catherine McKenna launched a public consultation asking Canadians to share their ideas on how the country can reduce plastic waste. Their feedback will help develop a federal, provincial and territorial approach.— With files from The Associated Presslast_img read more

TREB warns realtors on false sales data after 31M listing shows 1

first_imgRealtors must report accurate sales prices for properties they’ve listed now that the public can access that data, the Toronto Real Estate Board is warning its members.“We have received reports that some members have been reporting inaccurate figures in the sold prices of their listings due to privacy concerns raised by their customers,” TREB wrote in a letter sent to its members.The Canadian Press obtained a $3.1-million dollar listing in Scarborough that appeared to be reported as selling for $1.The listing now has an updated sold price tag of $2.98 million, according to Mongohouse, a website that includes sold prices.Publishing false prices is contrary to TREB’s rules and policies, and could lead to disciplinary proceedings, the board said in the letter, as well as possible membership suspension or termination.TREB chief executive John DiMichele said in a statement that the board regularly updates and advises its members on rules and best practices, and reiterated that inaccurate reporting runs counter to those rules.The real estate board has been embroiled in a seven-year legal battle to prevent the release of home sales data online, citing privacy and copyright concerns.It lost that fight when the Competition Bureau ruled the board must permit its members to publish such data on password-protected websites, and after the Supreme Court of Canada recently refused to hear the case.However, the board has since said it is studying ways to ensure that GTA home sales data is protected.It has also disputed when the 60-day window to prepare to release the data comes into effect. TREB says the window started in late August with the Supreme Court’s decision, but the Competition Bureau said the window closed a long time ago.Still, the board has threatened real estate companies that it believes have released home sales data too soon. It recently sent cease-and-desist letters to such companies, threatening to take away their data access and TREB memberships.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

Iran says it has added 2 mini submarines to its naval fleet

first_imgTEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s state TV says the country’s navy has acquired two new mini submarines designed for operations in shallow waters such as the Persian Gulf.Thursday’s report says the one of the submarines — also known as midget submarines — was built in 18 months. The other, previously built, took 10 months to overhaul.The report says the two Ghadir-class submarines have sonar-evading technology and can launch missiles from under water, as well as fire torpedoes and drop marine mines. Iran began manufacturing Ghadir subs in 2005. The first was unveiled in 2007 and by 2012, five such submarines were incorporated into Iran’s navy.Midget submarines weigh less than 150 metric tons and are used for short missions, with no living accommodations for a crew of up to nine.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Proseccos bubble shows no sign of bursting

first_imgASOLO, Italy — Prosecco, the fruity sparkling wine made in the northeastern hills of Italy is gaining in global popularity — and producers of Champagne, for so long the dominant bubbly wine, are taking note.Prosecco has become the bestselling sparkling wine in the world by volume, and experts say it is eroding the market share of Champagne, the French wine that is synonymous with celebration but also comes with a heftier price tag. The Italian wine’s production eclipsed Champagne’s five years ago and is now 75 per cent higher at 544 million bottles.Champagne still claims the revenues crown, cashing in a record 4.9 billion euros ($5.6 billion) last year on 307 million bottles, 2.8 billion euros of that in exports. But Prosecco’s bubble shows no sign of bursting: exports this year are trending up 16 per cent.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Trans Mountain granted injunction against pipeline protesters at two BC sites

first_imgParker was also unsuccessful in his request for an order requiring the removal of a structure called the Watch House, sayingit’s on a pipeline right of way and would cause significant safety risks.“I’m sensitive to the concern of those who created this Watch House, that it is of considerable significance to them,” Afflecksaid of the structure that was erected near the Burnaby Terminal on Saturday, when people marched against the pipeline. VANCOUVER, B.C. – Protesters must be restrained from obstructing the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, says a British Columbia Supreme Court judge who has granted the company an injunction aimed at preventing people from entering within five metres of two work sites.Justice Kenneth Affleck said Thursday he felt it necessary to make a decision on the second day of a hearing instead of issuing a written order involving outraged demonstrators who have blocked vehicles and workers at the Burnaby Terminal and the Westridge Marine Terminal.The injunction is indefinite, allowing Trans Mountain to continue work it’s legally entitled to do after the federal government approved the twinning of an existing pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby in the belief it is in the best interest of Canada, Affleck said. Trans Mountain has said that while protests began last November, it sought an injunction after demonstrators began intensifying their blockades recently when trees were being cleared. It said construction at the sites in Burnaby, B.C., is expected to last until December 2020.Affleck agreed with lawyers for two of 15 named defendants in a notice of civil claim that a 50-metre perimeter as part of aninterim injunction he granted last week was too broad because it encroached on private property and trails.Trans Mountain’s lawyer, Shaun Parker, requested a structure called Camp Cloud near the Burnaby Terminal be removed, calling it a “hotbed of aggressive activity” for protesters who want to “destroy the project.”But the judge said it will stay.“In my view there has to be a means of allowing the protesters who object to this work to remain reasonably close to the site,” Affleck said. “The plaintiff is going to have to tolerate a certain amount of agitation.”center_img He said Trans Mountain would have to demonstrate any emergency need to remove the Watch House but would then have to replace it.Casey Leggett, a lawyer for one of the defendants, said citizens have a constitutional right to protest the expansion of the pipeline.“The inconvenience, which my friends call a blockade, hasn’t gotten to the level of establishing irreparable harm,” Leggett said.He read from affidavits presented in court by a Trans Mountain lawyer, saying the company’s security staff noted protesters have sometimes stood peacefully at or near access roads to two marine terminals in Burnaby without disrupting vehicles or workers and left after police arrived.He said in one case, a woman was seen praying on a road and didn’t engage with security staff while on another day a woman sat in a lawn chair as vehicles were guided around her at slow speed.Affleck said while the first protesters’ conduct was unobjectionable, the second woman had no right to sit in the middle of a public road and the police would be justified in removing her.The judge also suggested Leggett was cherry-picking incidents that did not involve blockades aimed at stopping work at the terminals.Leggett replied that Trans Mountain had done the same and also focused on blockades rather than inconvenience, which he said does not justify an injunction.Activists have said they will continue opposing the $7.4-billion project despite the injunction.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

So you wanna be SD60 Trustee visit the candidate information meeting tonight

first_imgThe five electoral areas are shown below:Area 1: Cecil Lake, Goodlow and Clayhurst – one trusteeArea 2: Prespatou, Buick, Rose Prairie, Doig RiverFirst Nation, Blueberry River First Nation, North Pine, Montney and Wonowon (east) – one trusteeArea 3: Hudson’s Hope, Upper Cache, Tsay Keh Dene Nation and Williston Lake – one trusteeArea 4: Taylor, Baldonnel and Two Rivers – one trusteeArea 5: Fort St. John, the Upper Halfway, Halfway River First Nation, Wonowon (west), Charlie Lake, Pink Mountain and north to Mile 225 on the Alaska Highway – three trusteesIn order to be eligible to run, you must be over the age of 18, have lived in B.C. for at least six months and be a Canadian citizen. Candidates don’t have to live in the electoral area where they’re running. School District #60 trustees receive an annual indemnity of $13,045 that is paid monthly.Voting day goes on October 20th. For more info click here. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – So you wanna be an SD60 Trustee? Then visit the School District 60 candidate information meeting Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.The event will show residents exactly what it is like being a trustee for a district with approximately 6,000 students.During this year’s election, seven people will be voted in to represent five electoral areas.  Current board members Bill Snow, Erin Evans and Ida Campbell have all decided to run again while Candace Dow, Jarret Thompson and Linda Stringer will step down.last_img read more

City Council approves rezoning of land for the Anglican Church

first_imgNow that zoning has been put back to its original state the church will sell the property and is looking forward to finding another piece of land in FSJ and building there.To read more about the Anglican Church and the selling of their land CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Council approved the rezoning application for the Anglican Church to return the designation of the land from Institutional to Low-Density Residential.At the public hearing held January 14th, 2019 during the Council Meeting, Council approved the Zoning Amendment for 8907 – 112 Avenue which is the land owned by the Anglican Church.“Two years previous this property had changed its zoning from residential to institutional in order to build a Church on the land. At the time of purchase, no one caught there was a ‘building scheme’ attached to the land, and it could not be removed.” says Bishop Lehmannlast_img read more